Will there be sufficient people to run our digital lives?

blog januari

We’re evolving towards a digital world. Erm, no. Let me start over. We live in a digital world. And things around us will only become more digital. Our smartphones are more and more becoming the center of our lives. We make phone calls, send txt messages, FB, watch movies, buy stuff, book holidays, taxi rides and hotel rooms. We manage our finances, track and share our sports activities, we navigate to any location, we leave a trail of where we were … all with one device.

Whether we realise it or not, this device that fits nicely in our hands is backed by an immense, ever-expanding network of applications, servers, connections and infrastructure. Things that need to be continuously developed and maintained. To do that, requires people. And that’s where we have a problem in Belgium. Our workforce isn’t growing fast enough and isn’t retrained fast enough. We still have people sitting in un employment. Unless we take action now and activate our workforce at an increased rate, we won’t be able to keep up with the digital pace. I guess however, Belgium’s not the only country struggling to fill all job openings.

According to Agoria (the umbrella organisation of all Belgian technology-based companies), more jobs are appearing than disappearing (+0,9% per year) while the workforce is growing only slowly (+0,3% per year). On top of this, digitalisation is changing the content of every job; for some limited, for others quite radical. Unless we take action, digitalisation and economic dynamics will result in more than half a million unfilled posts by 2030, in Belgium alone.

Expert jobs require expert people. Keep people within their focus, they’ll perform better and will be more engaged. People sometimes assume that data center housing is an IT job. It’s not, it’s an engineer’s. Data center construction and maintenance require expert knowledge on electrical power and circuitry, engines/generators, cooling and heating, architecture, security, energy efficiency… So why would you want to train an IT person to do an engineer’s job? It’s a completely different skill set. Anyway, you could use that IT person to focus on IT projects. That’s what you hired her/him for in the first place.

And why would you want to do it yourself inhouse. Besides the skill set, a data center that has an uptime of over 99,9%, requires a state-of-the-art infrastructure which by itself is a huge investment. We already made that investment, so why not outsource yours and benefit from the economies of scale? That way, you can also save on office space, which you will need for your future staff.

Be The Change – Shaping the Future of Work is a campaign by Agoria. Would you like to find out how our workforce – and you – will be impacted by the digitalisation of our lives; will you be the change? Then visit the Be The Change landing page.

Laurens van Reijen

Managing Director, LCL Data Centers

What do YOU prefer: a ‘self-service’ cloud provider or rather a ‘services-included’ cloud provider?

It took some time to convince businesses to migrate to the cloud – and there is still a certain percentage that hasn’t done so. They didn’t quite trust their applications and data would be secure. But now that many companies – large and small – see the advantages of the cloud, we get the opposite problem: there is too much trust.

People subscribe to cloud services paying peanuts, yet not expecting monkeys

A couple of years ago now, we had a clear case showing the difference. A large data center was struck by lightning. As a consequence, the clients of the data centre saw the light. The data centre lost some client data. They pointed out to their clients that it was their own fault. It’s the clients’ responsibility to take the necessary precautions to secure their data, not the cloud provider’s role to handle this, so they said. So these clients started realising that a self-service cloud does not entirely mean services are included. Quite on the contrary. The media reported that the clients’ calls weren’t answered. Whether literally no one was there or rather that they hadn’t planned to provide any service at all and therefore wouldn’t answer the calls: the clients were left in the cold.

People really want to be cheated, don’t they?

Do you really think that paying for cloud space with a credit card and without any personal contact would get you the same service as when buying from a real person who has listened to your needs? I don’t think so.

When you purchase from a cloud provider you can actually call someone and discuss your specific needs. These cloud providers generally have custom features. And the fact that you can speak to someone, really means that you can get support, as opposed to the situation where there’s no one you can call so no one to listen to your needs and able to support you. There are plenty of service-included cloud providers around: Joos Hybrid, Nucleus, Proact, Sentia, Tobania, just to name the ones we house.

There are no miracles, sorry…

People’s salaries represent a certain cost. If you want to be able to talk to someone, get custom features and/or support, that involves a person and a salary, so you pay the price. If you buy cloud space cheaply, that just means no human time is included. Did you agree to a standard offering? Watch it when you want to change your order. That also implies service.

At LCL, we house a lot of companies, government organisations and systems integrators requiring cloud services. We hear a lot of stories about cloud offerings being non-transparent, non-scalable, and financially unpredictable once you step outside what you initially signed for. If you buy into a standard, cheap offer, and you want to scale up or down, you’re dependant on your supplier. And as there’s no one who knows you, there’s no one to discuss your Frankly? Probably no one really cares beyond the monthly turnover. Meaning: unless you fit into the standard flow and all goes well, it’s plug-and-pray time. With some bad luck, you’re screwed.

A data centre is an ecosystem

When you choose a real data centre, especially one with a customer intimacy-strategy such as LCL, you enter an ecosystem. You have access to all the cloud providers you can wish for, the anonymous ‘self-service’ ones as well as the ‘service-included’ ones. We’re there to advise and accompany you. We want to understand your needs and make sure you get the solution that’s right for you. Because that’s the only way to build valuable long-term partnerships. And as we know our clients, we care for them to stay!

Laurens

Guest Blog – What it’s like to work at LCL: Matthias Borremans, Facilities Project Manager

Ecological cooling systems

Matthias Borremans is LCL’s Facilities Project Manager.

He joined the company nearly a year ago. What exactly does his job entail? And which projects does he oversee?

Matthias tells all in this guest blog.

“As the Facilities Project Manager, I am responsible for overseeing various projects at LCL. One part of my work involves advising management when technologies or topologies need to be selected.

As a data center, we have to take a great many matters into consideration, and it is impossible to study everything, or design every element, without bringing in outside assistance. I therefore work with a number of engineering consulting firms that focus on different aspects of the data center.

One of the major projects on which I am currently working concerns the preparations for the construction of a new data center in Aalst. LCL already has a branch in Aalst, and it is building a second, 1200 m² data room behind its existing site. A data center cannot simply be thrown together. A study needs to be performed first, which can take up to 18 months. I check the study and monitor the implementation and delivery of the project. I always seek out the best technology and like to think outside the box. And as data centers are extremely energy-intensive, I like to come up with new ideas to help us be as environmentally friendly as possible.

For example, I considered the various cooling options for the new data center. One way to keep cooling generators cool is to spray water on them, in a process referred to as adiabatic cooling. This uses drinking water, however, which evaporates once it has been sprayed. We discussed the ethics of this within LCL, and asked ourselves whether it is acceptable to use drinking water for cooling and simply allow it to evaporate. A system of this kind does not consume a great deal of energy, is compact and can be fully redundant, but we decided it was not an environmentally responsible choice, and so we looked for an alternative solution. In the end, we opted for a system that can collect rainwater to cool down the dry coolers in hot weather.

In addition, the temperature range of the cooling water in the data center in Aalst will not be as low as in traditional systems. The cooling water will be cooled by the air outside when the outdoor temperature is lower than the temperature indoors (this is the case most of the year in Belgium), which means there will be no need to use cooling equipment. To ensure we can use this free cooling for as long as possible, we have selected the largest possible dry coolers, which will make it easier to remove heat. Using free cooling will allow us to achieve substantial energy savings.

The cooling system in the new data center in Aalst will be dual redundant (2N redundancy). This means there will be two backup cooling systems. As we want to maximize the space in the new data room, the cooling generators have been placed on the roof. To assist us with this, we called on the services of a stability engineer.

The construction project in Aalst is scheduled for completion at the end of 2018.”

Matthias Borremans, Facilities Project Manager at LCL

Let’s join forces for data center outsourcing

Over the past years, I have made attempts, with the Dutch Datacenter Association, to set up a Belgian Datacenter Association in one form or another, in order to promote the interests of data centers in our country.

This organization will put us on the international map owing to the unique position we hold in the heart of Europe, with London and Paris just 5 milliseconds away and Amsterdam even closer. You can probably relate to the idea.

Belgians not only have a brick in their stomach, they clearly also have a data center or server room in their stomach.

In terms of data center outsourcing, our country must be ranked like bottom of the list. People do not feel comfortable if their server is not in their basement, as it were.

 

When I hear CIOs talk about how their management views the potential outsourcing of their data center, I sometimes feel as if I am back in the Middle Ages.

But in those days there were fortresses, of course, and people did not need electricity. Today, the needs of businesses are somewhat more sophisticated, and internal data centers or server rooms are slightly more vulnerable than a fortress armory.

Given this, jointly promoting external data centers would be a very useful exercise.

Unfortunately, most Belgian data center businesses only pay lip service to collaboration. They limit themselves to their own daily challenges, rather than investing time in joining forces, let alone looking beyond national borders.

Of course, I am Dutch. I have seen genuine efforts in this area in the Netherlands, and they are bearing fruit. But in Belgium, LCL’s is a lone voice in the wilderness.

 

Laurens van Reijen, Managing Director LCL

Who has better Business Continuity than Belgocontrol?

cabletray
Data Center LCL

A lot of sarcasm on social media and in the press yesterday and today, about Belgocontrol’s failing power backup. Next to the economic damage, there’s the reputation damage. A lot of companies are no better though. When confronted with a power cut, whether as a test or a real one, most companies will bear unexpected consequences. And what is more: a lot of IT Managers are quite aware of that. I bet many IT Managers haven’t slept well last night…

It’s true that redundancy of all your critical systems and assets in general, such as Belgocontrol’s control tower, requires an investment. Some IT Managers tell us their CFO or CEO won’t give them the budgets to do what is really needed. Let’s hope yesterday’s adventures have learned these CXO’s what’s really at stake.

As a CEO, if you really want to be sure that your business continuity is satisfactory, you need to make sure a full test is done. Many don’t dare test as it should be done, so they never know whether their precautions are quite enough. For your IT it’s somewhat easier: you can go for the OPEX rather than the CAPEX model, and confide in LCL’s data centers to make sure your systems are protected and your business continuity really works… We do a real test at least every month, actually cutting the power entirely. We can safely say that we can honor the SLA of our Tier III certification. Last night, like (most) every night, I personally slept like a baby!

Laurens van Reijen, CEO of LCL data centers